What is Chapter 7 Bankruptcy? Qualifications and How to File

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Written by: Attorney Robert Stiberman
Last Updated February 12, 2024

In a nutshell, Chapter 7 bankruptcy is a liquidation bankruptcy that both businesses and individuals can file. Your non-exempt property will be used to repay your creditors. Most bankruptcy cases are classified as “no-asset” cases, meaning you can eliminate your dischargeable debts without losing any of your property—source: Chapter 7 – Bankruptcy Basics.

One of the key benefits of working with bankruptcy attorney Robert Stiberman is his extensive knowledge of Florida’s bankruptcy laws and exemptions. He understands how the law applies to your unique situation and can help you protect your exempt property while eliminating as much debt as possible. It is important to note that Chapter 7 bankruptcy may not be the best option for everyone. Robert Stiberman will work with you to analyze your financial situation, determine whether Chapter 7 bankruptcy is the right choice for you, and help you explore other options if necessary.

If you cannot pay credit card and medical bills, or you’re tired of endless phone calls from collection agencies and worried that you’d never escape debt, filing for bankruptcy may be the right decision. Read on to learn more about Chapter 7 and how Robert Stiberman can guide you through the Chapter 7 bankruptcy process.

Robert Stiberman Florida chapter 7 bankruptcy lawyer

Robert A. Stiberman. An attorney with over 20 years of experience in bankruptcy law.

Who qualifies for Chapter 7 bankruptcy? Should I file for chapter 7?

To be eligible for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, you must pass the means test and have completed a debtor education credit counseling course. You must complete the credit counseling course from an approved agency within 180 days before filing your bankruptcy petition. Source: 11 U.S.C. § 109 (h)(1) (section 109 (h). This means test involves comparing your household income to the median income for a family of your size in your state based on your average monthly income over the six months before filing your bankruptcy case—source: https://www.justice.gov/ust/means-testing.

The means test determines whether you have disposable income to repay your debts. If you don’t pass the first part of the means test, you may still qualify by taking the second part and overcoming the presumption of abuse. See 11 U.S.C. § 707(b).

However, if you cannot satisfy the means test, you may still be eligible for bankruptcy, but not under Chapter 7. Discussing your options with a bankruptcy attorney is essential to determine whether filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy is correct for you.

Understanding Eligible and Non-Eligible Debts for Chapter 7 Bankruptcy

Chapter 7 bankruptcy is a valuable legal resource for individuals and businesses struggling with overwhelming debt. A discharge is a permanent order prohibiting the debtor’s creditors from taking any form of collection action on discharged debts, including legal action and communications with the debtor, such as telephone calls, letters, and personal contacts. Source: Discharge in Bankruptcy – Bankruptcy Basics. However, it’s essential to understand which types of debts are eligible for discharge and which are not.

Eligible debts for discharge include:

  • Medical bills
  • Credit card debt
  • Payday loans
  • Old utility bills
  • Personal loans or small business loans
  • Taxes (in some instances)
  • Vehicle repossession debts

Debts that can’t be discharged include:

  • Most student loans
  • Income tax debts or property tax debt
  • Alimony and child support
  • Debts incurred under false pretenses or actual fraud
  • Consumer debts owed to a single creditor exceeding $500 incurred within 90 days before filing for bankruptcy.

Source: 11 U.S. Code § 523 – Exceptions to discharge

Who should wait to file?

If you recently received a bonus or believe your financial difficulties are only temporary, it may be best to wait before filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy. Negotiating a payment plan with your creditors or seeking other debt-relief options may be better in these situations.

A bankruptcy attorney can discuss other factors that may impact your decision to file, such as not using credit cards or making payments at least four months before filing, the impact of debt repayment or transfers, personal injury claims, and pending lawsuits.

It is also important to note that filing for bankruptcy will impact your credit score, but some clients have seen their score increase after filing.

Should I file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy right now?

If you are currently experiencing wage garnishment, civil lawsuit, or license suspension and have no costly non-exempt assets, filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy may be a viable option. This type of bankruptcy is designed to help those unable to repay their unsecured debts. However, consulting with a Chapter 7 lawyer is critical to determine if you have any nonexempt property. Once you file, the harassing calls from creditors must stop. You can learn more on this topic by visiting: Why Do People File for Bankruptcy? Common Reasons and How It Can Help.

Chapter 7 vs. Chapter 13 bankruptcy

Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy are two distinct types of bankruptcy that offer different solutions to debt problems.

Chapter 7 bankruptcy is also known as a “liquidation bankruptcy,” where the debtor’s nonexempt assets are sold to pay off their creditors. This process is typically quick and can take 90 to 120 days from filing to discharge. Most cases are no-asset cases, meaning the debtor gets to keep their property.

In contrast, Chapter 13 bankruptcy is a reorganization bankruptcy where the debtor’s disposable income is applied to repay their debts over a 3 to 5-year period. Chapter 13 allows the debtor to catch up on missed mortgage payments, property taxes, HOA dues, car payments, and child support. Additionally, it is possible to reduce the interest rate on financed vehicles. However, Chapter 13 requires regular income to fund the plan—source: Chapter 13 – Bankruptcy Basics.

To determine which type of bankruptcy is right for you, you’ll need to consult an experienced bankruptcy attorney. At Stiberman Law, our attorneys are dedicated to providing personalized solutions to your debt problems. Visit https://stibermanlaw.com/chapter-7-vs-chapter-13-bankruptcy/ for a detailed discussion of the differences between Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

How often can you file chapter 7?

No limit exists on how often you can file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy unless a court order says otherwise. However, if you have previously received a discharge in a Chapter 7 case and seek to discharge your debts again, you must wait eight years from the previous filing date. Time restrictions may vary depending on the chapter, so it’s best to consult an experienced Chapter 7 lawyer for more detailed information. Contact Stiberman Law for a consultation. We invite you to visit  https://stibermanlaw.com/how-often-can-you-file-bankruptcy/ for more information on this topic.

How much does filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy cost?

If you’re considering filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy in 2024, you might wonder about the costs involved. To begin with, a filing fee of $338.00 is due at the time of filing. In Florida, you can pay the filing fee in installments or apply to have the fee waived if you earn more than 15% below the national poverty line.

Aside from the filing fee, you must complete a credit counseling course online or over the phone 180 days before filing. After filing, you’ll need to complete a financial management course before you can be discharged. These courses range from $10-45; some providers may waive the fee based on your income.

It’s also worth noting that you’re entitled to a free credit report once a year. As for attorney’s fees, they can vary depending on the complexity of your case, but most attorneys offer affordable payment plans if needed.

Alternatives to Chapter 7 bankruptcy

When faced with overwhelming debt, there may be better solutions than filing Chapter 7 bankruptcy. The correct course of action will depend on your specific financial situation and the type of debt you owe.

If you’re struggling to keep up with payments to your creditors, there are a few alternatives worth considering. One option is a debt management plan, which involves working with a credit counseling agency to negotiate a repayment plan you can afford. Another option is to deal directly with your creditors and try to reach a payment arrangement that works for both parties.

If your debts are spread across multiple accounts, you can explore consolidating them into a single loan with a lower interest rate. Alternatively, you could seek financial assistance from family or friends to help satisfy your debts.

Before deciding on a debt relief option, it’s essential to consult with an attorney or agency that specializes in this area. They can help you understand your rights and obligations and guide you toward the best course of action based on your circumstances.

What is life after bankruptcy? How long does Chapter 7 bankruptcy take?

If you’re considering Chapter 7 bankruptcy, you may wonder what life will be like after the process is complete and how long it typically takes.

In most cases, Chapter 7 bankruptcy takes around four to five months from start to finish. Once you’ve been discharged, you may find that your credit score starts to improve. Some people even receive credit offers within months of obtaining their discharge.

However, it’s important to remember that bankruptcy will remain on your credit report for up to ten years, making it harder to obtain credit or loans during that time. Nonetheless, completing the bankruptcy process can be a massive relief for many people, lifting a weight they’ve been carrying for a long time.

Chapter 7 Bankruptcy discharge

Once you’ve filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, one of the critical milestones is obtaining an Order of Discharge. This order signifies that you are no longer personally liable for the dischargeable debts listed in your bankruptcy forms and that your creditors can no longer take legal action against you to collect those debts.

It’s worth noting, however, that the bankruptcy court can deny a discharge in certain circumstances. For example, if you fail to cooperate with the trustee, hide assets, or engage in activities intended to defraud or hinder creditors, the court may refuse to grant you a discharge.

In addition to meeting these requirements, you must complete a second debtor education or financial management course (in addition to the credit counseling course you completed before filing) unless the court excuses you. Source F.R.B.P 1007(b)(7). Once you have fulfilled all these requirements and the court grants you a discharge, you’ll be well on your way to rebuilding your financial life.

Chapter 7 Property exemptions

When filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, it’s essential to understand how property exemptions work. A Chapter 7 trustee may seek to liquidate any nonexempt assets you have to pay your creditors. In contrast, you can keep the exempted property. For this reason, it’s critical to work with a knowledgeable Chapter 7 attorney who can help you navigate the complex web of bankruptcy laws and exemptions.

If you’re filing for bankruptcy in Florida, many exemptions may be available, including the homestead exemption, the $1000 motor vehicle exemption, and the $4000 wildcard exemption (where applicable). Sources: Florida. Const. Art. X, § 4(a)(1)Fla Stat Ann Secs. 222.01 & 222.02.

Please consult your attorney if you would like to learn more about these exemptions and how they apply to your case. You can also visit this link for more information: https://stibermanlaw.com/bankruptcy-exemptions-in-florida/

What do you lose in Chapter 7 bankruptcy?

Chapter 7 bankruptcy is a serious decision with significant consequences. Before taking any action, it’s essential to seek the advice of an experienced attorney. One of the key aspects of Chapter 7 bankruptcy is liquidation, which means that your bankruptcy trustee can sell off any non-exempt assets.

In Florida, for example, if you own a vehicle with more than $1000 in equity and cannot apply any other available exemptions to protect it, the bankruptcy trustee may require you to pay the nonexempt amount to keep your vehicle.

It’s worth noting that in Chapter 13 bankruptcy, the trustee does not seek to liquidate your assets. However, it’s still important to work with a knowledgeable attorney to ensure that you understand all of the potential consequences of filing for bankruptcy and to help you make informed decisions about your financial future.

How does Chapter 7 Bankruptcy work?

After passing the means test, completing the required credit counseling course, paying the filing fee, and submitting all the necessary bankruptcy forms, the debtor will receive a case number, and a trustee will be appointed. Once the petition is filed, all civil actions against the debtor are temporarily suspended. Source: 11 U.S.C. § 362. You can also visit this link for more information: What Is an Automatic Stay In Chapter 7 Bankruptcy?

Within a few days of filing, the debtor will receive a notice with the meeting of creditors date, where the trustee and creditors can ask questions. The conference is typically held within 45 days and can be over the phone.

After the meeting, the trustee may choose to liquidate any nonexempt assets to pay creditors or file a report of no distribution if there is nothing to liquidate. To be eligible for a discharge, the debtor must complete a second credit counseling or financial management course from an approved agency. Source: Federal Rules of Bankruptcy Procedure: Rule 4004. Grant or Denial of Discharge.

Can I keep my property if I file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy?

If you file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, you may be able to keep your property if it is exempt. Properly claiming exemptions is critical to protect your assets. In Florida, you may be required to claim Florida or Federal exemptions based on the length of your residency. If you want to ensure that you can keep your assets, consider filing for Chapter 13 bankruptcy instead.

Chapter 7 Bankruptcy: Pros and Cons

Pros

  • Quick process, usually lasting only 90 to 120 days from filing to discharge.
  • Most cases are “no asset” cases, meaning little or no property liquidation is required (but each case is unique, so consult with a lawyer).
  • Florida offers some of the most robust exemptions in the country, allowing you to protect more of your property.
  • There is no limit to the amount of debt you can eliminate.
  • Filing is relatively low-cost compared to other debt-relief options.
  • Unsecured debts such as credit card debt and personal loans can be discharged.

Cons

  • You must pass the means test to be eligible for Chapter 7 bankruptcy.
  • Secured debts, such as mortgages and car loans, must be kept current to avoid losing the asset.
  • Nonexempt assets may need to be liquidated to pay creditors.
  • Not all debts, such as student loans, child support, and alimony, can be discharged.
  • A Chapter 7 bankruptcy will stay on your credit report for up to 10 years, although many clients obtain new credit within a few months of receiving their discharge.

Contact a Florida Chapter 7 Attorney

If you’re considering filing for Chapter 7 Bankruptcy in Florida, contacting an attorney at Stiberman Law is essential. We offer a free consultation to help you understand your options and decide whether Chapter 7 bankruptcy is right for you.

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Foreclosure and Chapter 7

If you own a home, your primary concern about filing for bankruptcy is whether or not you will lose your home. This depends on whether you have remained in good standing with your mortgage. If you maintain your house payments for your primary residence, you will most likely get to keep your property.

However, if the foreclosure process has started, although filing for bankruptcy may give you additional time to find a new place to live or attempt or attempt to work something out with your lender, Chapter 7 only pauses the proceedings temporarily. Once it has been finalized, or if the bank obtains permission from the bankruptcy court, it can continue with the foreclosure process.

We recommend that you review your options in Chapter 13 bankruptcy as it contains mechanisms to get caught up with missed mortgage payments over three to five years or try a loan modification through bankruptcy to save your home.

Speaking with a bankruptcy lawyer at Stiberman Law is essential to get more personalized insight into your unique situation and better understand whether your house is safe from foreclosure or being seized during the liquidation process.

Is Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Right for You?

Many clients searched the web for a “bankruptcy lawyer near me” for information and advice on Chapter 7 bankruptcy. Chapter 7 bankruptcy is only available to some as there is a means test to limit the number of eligible people for debt elimination.

Eligibility is determined by checking whether your household income is below your state’s median income. For example, as of this article, the median income for a family of four in Florida is approximately $89,206.

The court will also look at your necessary or allowable expenses, such as the cost of housing, groceries, and medical care to determine your disposable income that could be used to pay off your debts.

If your disposable income is determined to be enough to pay off some or all of your debts, you may be ineligible for Chapter 7, and filing for Chapter 13 bankruptcy may be the better option.

Even if you are eligible to file, there may be better courses of action than filing chapter 7. For example, suppose most of your debts are federal student loans that cannot be discharged, or you have valuable nonexempt property. In that case, you’ll need to consult an experienced Chapter 7 lawyer to discuss the proper steps for your financial future.

Do You Need a Chapter 7 Lawyer to File for Bankruptcy?

Legally, you do not have to have a lawyer to file for bankruptcy on your behalf. However, it is highly recommended that you have an attorney who can help you navigate the process, explain what you can expect, and advocate for you.

A Chapter 7 lawyer will:

  • Be available to answer questions specifically based on your unique circumstances.
  • Inform you of the necessary documentation and information before your court date.
  • Help you set reasonable expectations and know what to expect for the outcome of your filing.
  • Work to protect as many of your assets as possible.
  • Be present in court to be your advocate against your debtors.

At Stiberman Law, we have over 12 years of experience helping people like you navigate bankruptcy and come through the process with financial freedom and a clean slate.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Chapter 7 Bankruptcy

Before Filing Chapter 7

Why do people file for bankruptcy?

How Does Bankruptcy Affect Your Spouse? Including Their Income and Expenses on Bankruptcy Forms

What are the advantages of filing for bankruptcy?

How much debt do you need to file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy?

Do you include all debt when filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy?

How much does it cost to file for bankruptcy?

What happens to my car in Chapter 7 bankruptcy?

What can you keep in Chapter 7 bankruptcy?

When is the Right Time to File for Bankruptcy?

What are Florida bankruptcy exemptions, and why are they important?

Does declaring bankruptcy clear all debts?

What documents do I need to file for bankruptcy?

What bankruptcy forms do I need to fill out?

What is the bankruptcy means test?

How do I pass the means test?

Does filing for bankruptcy stop foreclosure in Florida?

How often can you file for bankruptcy?

Can you lose your house when filing for bankruptcy in Florida?

Can bankruptcy stop an eviction in Florida?

How To File Bankruptcy for Free: A 10-Step Guide

Debts

Can you file for bankruptcy to eliminate medical bills?

Does declaring bankruptcy clear all debts?

Can I file for bankruptcy to discharge child support debt?

Can bankruptcy clear a judgment in Florida?

Length of Time

How long does Chapter 7 take?

How long does it take to obtain a bankruptcy discharge?

What happens when you file Chapter 7

What happens when a person declares Chapter 7 bankruptcy?

What happens after filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy?

What is the automatic stay?

What happens at a 341 meeting of creditors?

Effects

Can I buy a house after filing for bankruptcy?

How long does bankruptcy stay on my credit report?

What is the downside of filing for bankruptcy?

Can a bankruptcy in Florida be removed from a credit report?

People also ask

What is the difference between bankruptcy dismissal and a discharge?

How to file an emergency bankruptcy petition?

How find an emergency bankruptcy lawyer?

What is the difference between chapter 7 and chapter 13 bankruptcy?

What are the steps to filing for bankruptcy after divorce?

How to File Chapter 7 for no money?

My Bankruptcy Was Dismissed. What Happens Now?

What is a Bankruptcy Audit: Understanding the Purpose and Process

Continue Leaning about Chapter 7 Bankruptcy

Understanding the 341 Meeting of Creditors in Bankruptcy

Understanding the Presumption of Abuse in Bankruptcy

Understanding Self-Employment Income and Bankruptcy for Business Owners

The Importance of Accurate Expense Records in Bankruptcy

Quick answers

Q1: How long does the Chapter 7 bankruptcy process take?

A: The Chapter 7 bankruptcy process typically takes 3-4 months from filing to discharge. Learn more by visiting: How Long Does Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Take?

Q2: What happens to my non-exempt assets in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy?

A: Non-exempt assets may be sold by the bankruptcy trustee to pay off creditors. However, exemptions may be available to protect certain types and amounts of property. A bankruptcy lawyer can help you determine what property may be exempt and how to maximize your exemptions.

Q3: What debts can be discharged in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy?

A: Most unsecured debts can be discharged in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy, including credit card debt, medical bills, personal loans, and other unsecured debts. However, some debts, such as student loans, tax debts, and domestic support obligations, are not dischargeable.

Q4: Can I keep my house in Chapter 7 bankruptcy?

A: Whether or not you can keep your house in Chapter 7 bankruptcy depends on several factors, such as the amount of equity you have in the property, the exemptions available in your state, and whether you are current on your mortgage payments. Chapter 7 filers who can claim the Florida homestead exemption can exempt an unlimited amount of the value of their primary residence from creditors, including in bankruptcy proceedings. This means that even if a debtor files for Chapter 7 bankruptcy, they can still keep their home if it is protected under the homestead exemption. The homestead exemption applies to real property, including a mobile home or a co-op apartment, as long as it is the debtor’s primary residence. However, the exemption has certain limitations and requirements, such as the property size, the time the debtor has owned and occupied the property, and other factors. A bankruptcy lawyer can help you explore your options.

Q5: Can I file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy more than once?

A: Yes, but there are restrictions on when you can file again. If you received a discharge in a previous Chapter 7 bankruptcy, you must wait at least eight years before filing for Chapter 7 again. If you previously filed for Chapter 13 bankruptcy, you must wait at least six years before filing for Chapter 7. However, if you want to file for Chapter 13 bankruptcy, you only need to wait at least four years from when you filed a previous chapter 5 and received a discharge.

Q6: Will filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy hurt my credit?

A: Filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy will hurt your credit score. However, your credit score may be low if you already struggle with debt. Rebuilding your credit after bankruptcy is possible by paying bills on time, obtaining secured credit cards, and monitoring your credit report. A bankruptcy lawyer can guide you in rebuilding your credit after bankruptcy.

Q7: What happens if I don’t make my car payments?

A: If you don’t make car payments, your lender can repossess your vehicle. Depending on the lender and state laws, they may take time to repossess the car after missing a payment. If you file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy and surrender the vehicle, the lender may take some time to repossess it, but they have the legal right to do so. Communicating with your lender and exploring loan modifications or refinancing options is essential to avoid defaulting on car payments. If you struggle to make car payments, consider exploring Chapter 13 bankruptcy. With Chapter 13, you may be able to get current on your car payments for 36 to 60 months while keeping your car and avoiding repossession. This can allow you to catch up on payments and get your finances back on track. However, you’ll need to consult a knowledgeable bankruptcy attorney to evaluate if filing for bankruptcy suits your circumstances.

Q8: Will filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy hurt my credit?

A: Filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy will hurt your credit score. However, your credit score may be low if you already struggle with debt. Rebuilding your credit after bankruptcy is possible by paying bills on time, obtaining secured credit cards, and monitoring your credit report. A bankruptcy lawyer can guide you in rebuilding your credit after bankruptcy.

Q9. How can I find bankruptcy lawyers in my area?

A. When searching online for “bankruptcy lawyers in my area,” it is a good idea to see how long the bankruptcy attorney has been practicing in your area and if the attorney offers a free consultation to discuss your options. Another way to find an attorney near you is to contact your local bar association for bankruptcy attorney referrals.

Q10. How much cash can you keep when filing chapter 7?

A. You can keep up to $1000 in cash and personal property when filing Chapter 7 bankruptcy with Florida exemptions. You may also be able to keep up to $5000 in cash if you are not claiming the Florida homestead exemption and are applying for the $4000 wildcard exemption. Click on the following link to learn about: bankruptcy exemptions and how much you can protect.

Bankruptcy Attorney Robert Stiberman in Miami Office

Q11. Will I lose my car by filing for chapter bankruptcy?

A. Whether or not you will lose your car in Chapter 7 bankruptcy depends on the amount of equity you have in the vehicle and the exemptions available in your state. In some states, you can exempt a certain amount of personal property, including vehicles, from the bankruptcy estate. For example, in Florida, you can exempt up to $5,000 in personal property if you don’t own a home. If your vehicle is worth less than $5,000, and you own it without a loan, it is exempt (you must properly claim the exemption – it is not automatic), and you can keep your car.  If your equity exceeds the exemption, you may be able to negotiate a repayment plan to keep the car.

Q12. How Long Does Chapter 7 Stay on My Credit?

A. It stays on your credit for 10 years, but your credit score will improve over time if you stay in good standing with any other debts you may accrue following the bankruptcy.

Q13. Are Student Loans Discharged During Chapter 7 Bankruptcy?

A. If you have federal student loans, you can not typically discharge these in bankruptcy. However, discharging other debts in conjunction with an income based repayment plan can help you get back in good standing with your student loan provider.

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Experienced Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Lawyers in Florida

Chapter 7 attorney, Robert StibermanFounded by Attorney Robert A. Stiberman, Stiberman Law focuses exclusively on personal bankruptcy work, specializing in chapter 7 and 13 cases. Our Florida bankruptcy attorney and friendly professional staff have the knowledge and experience to answer your questions and help you avoid any potential pitfalls in the bankruptcy process.

Since our inception, we have striven to help many people achieve a brighter financial future. We are thankful for the opportunity to provide much-needed assistance to those community members who cannot obtain it for themselves. Smart choices today can help you realize the future you deserve.

Choosing a law firm to represent you is an important decision. Mr. Stiberman was admitted to The Florida Bar in 1998 after graduating from the University Of Miami School Of Law in 1996. He began his legal career as a volunteer attorney in the Miami-Dade Public Defenders Office. Also, he worked as an associate for a firm in South Florida that handles real estate-related matters.

Robert founded Stiberman Law in 2007 and, in 2009, began representing clients in Bankruptcy matters. Attorney Stiberman is admitted to the United States District Court for the NorthernMiddle,  and Southern Districts of Florida and is authorized to represent bankruptcy clients throughout Florida.

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a Bankruptcy Chapter 7 Lawyer in Florida Today

The decision to file for bankruptcy can be difficult, and the process can be overwhelming. You can schedule a free consultation with an experienced Chapter 7 lawyer at Stiberman Law today and learn more about your options. In addition to having an advocate on your side to fight for your best interest, we offer affordable prices and sensible payment plans to help you through this experience so you can achieve financial freedom. Call us today at (954) 922-2283 or fill out our contact form to get started.

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Posted 2/10/23 – What happens after filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy?

Posted 2/10/23 – What happens to your car in Chapter 7 bankruptcy?

Posted 10/26/22 – Bankruptcy attorney Robert Stiberman discusses the Chapter 7 means test

Posted 7/29/2022 – Document needed to file Chapter 7 bankruptcy

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